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Jericho Center

JERICHO Hotels

Jericho Resort Hotel Under classification
Phone:00970 2 2321255
Email: reservation@jerichoresorts.com
Website: www.jerichoresorts.com

 

 

Jerusalem Hotel & Restaurant Under classification
Phone:00970 2 2322444

 

Moon City Hotel
Phone:00970 2 2326844
Email: moon_city_hotel@yahoo.com

 

Oasis Hotel Five Stars
Phone:00970 2 2311200
Email: jrcha.info@ihg.com
Website: www.oasis-jericho.ps

 

 

 

 

Jericho

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Located 36 km east of Jerusalem, Jericho is on the road to Amman and at the junction of the highway to the Galilee. In Jericho is Tel As-Sultan, the ancient city of Jericho, which is the lowest (258 m below sea level) and the oldest town on earth, dating back more than 10,000 years. It grew up around a perennial spring, Ain As-Sultan, in an area of fertile alluvial soil which attracted hunter-gatherer groups to settle and start the process of plant and animal domestication. Ain As-Sultan is known as Elisha’s spring, where the prophet Elisha cleansed the water of Jericho.

Jericho’s moderate climate makes it a favourite winter resort, as it is always a number of degrees warmer than other parts of Palestine owing to its low elevation and the height of the surrounding mountains. It is an important agricultural area, producing fresh fruits, and vegetables year round. Jericho dates, bananas and citrus fruits are especially famous.

 

Tell es-Sultan (ancient Jericho), the Oldest City in the World

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The site of Tell As-Sultan is located in the lower plain of the Jordan valley, approximately 10 km north of the Dead Sea. At a depth of 250 m below sea level, and with a history dating back to the Neolithic period, it is the lowest and the oldest town on the earth. The mound where the ruins of the town were found covers an area of about one acre.

The city of ancient Jericho was mentioned in historical sources, a recent find has the name appear on a scarab from the second millennia BC.

Successive excavations at the site uncovered its cultural history stretching 10 thousand years. The earliest remains belong to the Natufian culture (10th-8th millennia BC), and consist of flint tools, which attests to the presence of a hunting Natufian camp near the spring.   The remains of the early Neolithic settlement are represented by a small settlement, with round houses built of mud brick and surrounded by a wall and a round tower, representing the earliest preserved piece of a fortification system.

Jericho played a major role in the early stages of Christianity. In the late Roman and Byzantine periods, the town was reduced to the area of modern Jericho. It was mentioned in several classical sources, including the sixth-century Madaba Mosaic map, where it was marked by the symbol of a church and a palm tree, along with the inscription, “Of St. Elisha.”

Archaeological excavations in the last century have revealed archaeological remains from various sites in the historic core of modern Jericho which shed light on the history of Jericho during the Byzantine period. A considerable number of churches from the Byzantine period have been found in the vicinity of Jericho, including Tell Al-Hassan, the Coptic Church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Abuna Anthimos, and Khirbat En-Nitla. Byzantine remains, including a colourful mosaic floor, were uncovered in 1962. In 2010, during construction work of the Russian museum in Jericho, a salvage excavation was carried out in the area by a Palestinian-Russian expedition, under the direction of Dr. H. Taha and Dr. L.A. Beliaev. The expedition uncovered more architectural remains, including a mosaic floor, which was found during bulldozing work, and a series of buildings dating to early Roman, Byzantine Umayyad, Medieval, and Ottoman periods.

A series of rehabilitation work was carried out in the site by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities during the last decade, within the framework of cooperation with the University of Rome La Sapienza and UNESCO. The site continues to reveal information of some of the earliest civilizations on earth, as well as details about their ways of life and habitation.

 

Monastery of Temptation (Deir Quruntel)

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The summit of the Mount of Temptation rises sharply 350 m above sea level, commanding a magnificent view of the Jordan Valley. The 30 to 40 caves on the eastern slopes of the mountain have been inhabited by monks and hermits since the early days of Christianity. It is the site where Jesus spent forty days and nights fasting and meditating during the temptation of Satan. A monastery was built in the sixth century over the cave where Christ stayed. The path leading to the monastery is very steep and difficult to climb, but is well worth the walk. Alternatively, a cable car scales the heights of the cliff, providing a spectacular view of the surrounding valley.

 

Hisham’s Palace

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Hisham’s Palace is located on the northern bank of Wadi Nueima, 2 km north of Jericho in the Jordan Valley. It was identified as the ruins of Kh. Al-Mafjer. The site was built by Caliph Hisham bin Abed el-Malik who reigned between 724 to 743 AD. The site was used as a winter resort. The spectacular palace was destroyed in a severe earthquake in 749 AD.

The excavation was carried out by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities, between 1935 and 1946 under the direction of D. Baramki and R. Hamilton. The excavation uncovered a significant part of the palace complex. In 2006 excavation was carried out in the bath area, under the direction of H. Taha and between 2010 and 2013 a joint Palestinian-American expedition uncovered the north gate of the palace and remains of the Abbasid occupation in the northern part of the palace

The site is composed of a palace, a thermal bath complex, a mosque, and a monumental fountain within a perimeter wall that was never completed. The three first principal buildings were arranged along the west side of a common forecourt, with a pool covered with a pavilion in its center.

The palace was two stories with towers at the corners. The entrance to the palace was through a vaulted passage, lined with benches on both sides. It was planned around a central courtyard that was enclosed by four arcaded galleries. On the southern side a small mosque was found. In the western gallery of the central courtyard a stairway led to an antechamber paved with mosaics, which lead to an underground vaulted room, or sirdab, with benches and a mosaic floor. The common mosque is attached to the northern wall of the palace.

The large bath is located in the northern part of the palace. It consisted of a domed porch on the east, a great reception hall, a series of small bathing rooms and a latrine. The reception hall was paved with 38 colorful mosaics. In the southern part of the bath, a large swimming pool was found.

At the northwest corner of the reception hall is the diwan, a small guest room, with benches along the walls. The floor of the diwan was paved with fine mosaics, depicting the scene of the tree of life. The palace was supplied with water through an open channel from the Ein Deuk and Ein Nueima springs at the foot of Mount Quruntul.

Following the transfer of authority to the Palestinian side in Jericho, a large restoration and rehabilitation program was carried out by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities at the site,  in cooperation with UNESCO, the Italian Cooperation, ANERA and USAID. The archeological park now includes a modern interpretation centre, a mosaic laboratory, and a site museum, as well as a new bridge and access roads.

 

The Sycamore Tree and Russian Museum

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The sycamore tree that Zacchaeus climbed so as to see Christ on his walk to Jerusalem has been housed since 2010 on the grounds of the Russian museum in Jericho. A salvage excavation was carried out on the lands of the building in June-September 2010 by a Palestinian-Russian expedition, the fruits of which are on display in the museum itself.

Just north of the Russian compound, remains of a mosaic floor appeared during bulldozing work. Excavation teams revealed a series of buildings, and mosaic pavements dating to the early Roman, Byzantine Umayyad, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

These, and ruins of Byzantine churches in the area are a testament to the major role Jericho played in the early stages of Christianity.

 

Ain Ad-Deuk Synagogue

The site of the Ain Ad-Deuk synagogue is located on the northern Bank of Wadi Nueima, northwest of Jericho. The site was exposed in 1918 by a shell fired by the Turks at the British in the area. Excavations in 1919 revealed a mosaic floor decorated with menorahs and Aramaic inscription.

The synagogue consists of a main hall, a narthex, and an adjoining courtyard surrounded by a wall. The entrance of the courtyard was to the north. The hall had a basilical plan and was divided by two rows of six columns into a nave and two aisles. The entire hall was paved with mosaics, while the narthex was paved with a white mosaic laid in black frame.

A series of conservation activities were carried out at the Synagogue by the Palestinian Authority Department of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage in 2002 and 2004 aiming to maintain the mosaic pavements.

 

Shahwan House Mosaic

In 1936 a synagogue was discovered north of Tell As-Sultan in what is today the house basement of the Shahwan family. The remains revealed a building with a rectangular plan, divided into a nave and two aisles by two rows of square pillars. The pavement of the building is of mosaic with stylized geometric and floral design. In 2008 a series of restorations were carried out, including the restoration of the mosaic pavement.

Tawaheen As-Sukkar (The Sugar Mills)

Located in the lower foothills of the Jordan Valley, the original function of the once industrial zone is preserved in the name of the site, ‘the sugar mills.’ The mills give visitors an opportunity to take a look at an industrial installation for manufacturing sugar that was part of the economic activity in the Jordan Valley during the medieval period.

The Jordan Valley’s sugar cane cultivation and mills were mentioned in several early medieval sources, which described Jericho in 1225 AD as a city famous for sugar cane and dates. Three different components of the manufacturing process can be seen in the ruins of a water aqueduct, a courtyard, press, mill house, refinery, furnace, kitchen and a storage house.  These represent three parts of the process: a water system, refinery, and the agricultural land.

Sugar cane was planted and harvested on the land, then shredded, crushed, and pressed. It was later boiled, and the resulting crystallized sugar was removed from the containers. The mill was powered by water brought by aqueducts from the springs of Ain Nueima and Ain Deyuk at the north-eastern foot of Mount of Temptation.

 

Qumran

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Located 15km south of Jericho on the western shore of the Dead Sea, this is the site where the famous Dead Sea Scrolls were found. A Palestinian shepherd looking for a stray goat made the discovery of the scrolls in 1947.

The scrolls consist of copies of biblical and apocryphal literature, the writings of the sect, including the Commentaries, the Rule of the Community, the Scroll of the War of the Sons of Light against the Sons of Darkness, and the Damascus Document. The dates of these scrolls range from the second century BC to 68 AD, but mostly dated from the first century BC. The study of the scrolls developed into an academic discipline known as Qumranic studies. It provides us with valuable information about the history of Judaism and the early phase of Christianity.

Following the find, several excavations were carried out in the site and the surrounding caves. The excavated site revealed a large complex of buildings, including communal facilities, a sophisticated water system, a library, and a large cemetery.

 

Wadi Qelt and the Monastery of Saint George

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Wadi Qelt is a natural rift with high, sheer rock walls extending 45 km through the hills between Jerusalem and Jericho. Hermits have inhabited the wadi since the third century. Today, it is a wonderful place for hiking, especially in the winter. The Monastery of Saint George, Deir Al-Qelt, is an impressive structure carved out of the rock of the cliff walls. Built in the fifth or sixth century, the monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion of Palestine. Most of the present monastery dates back to a 1901 restoration done by the Greek Orthodox Church.

 

The Good Samaritan Inn

Located 10 km east of Jerusalem on the main road to Jericho, the Good Samaritan Inn (Al-Khan Al-Ahmar, literally ‘The Red Inn’) is a sixteenth-century structure that once served as a rest stop for travellers. Today, the inn is occupied by a souvenir shop and a Bedouin tent serving refreshments to tourists. On the other side of the road are the remains of Saint Euthymius Church, which was built in the fifth century to commemorate the biblical story of the Good Samaritan.

 

Maqam An-Nabi Musa

Nabi Musa is the Arabic name for the Prophet Moses, who is recognised as one of the most important prophets in Islam, as well as Christianity and Judaism. Maqam An-Nabi Musa has been the site of an annual pilgrimage since the time of Salah Ad-Din. Set in an awe-inspiring landscape 20 km east of Jerusalem, the shrine is a splendid example of medieval Islamic architecture. The shrine, mosque, minaret, and some of the rooms at the site were built in 1269, and successive additions were added in 1475.

 

The Jordan River

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The Jordan River flows from Mount Hermon in Syria, about 3,000 feet above sea level, to the Dead Sea, which is 1,300 feet below sea level. The winding Jordan River, with an average width of 100 feet, covers a distance of only 65 miles as the crow flies. However, if it were stretched out, the riverbed would cover 160 miles end-to-end. Jesus was baptised by John in the Jordan River, and ever since, the river has been a holy site for Christians, with many pilgrims visiting the river every year to be baptised.

 

The Dead Sea

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The Dead Sea, also known as the Salt Sea and the Sea of Lot, is a unique body of water in the Jordan Rift Valley. The Dead Sea is 85 km long and 17 km wide and covers an area of about 677 square km. It lies about 417 m below sea level, making the Dead Sea the lowest point on Earth. In addition, the Dead Sea is the world’s saltiest large water body, with a salt concentration ten times higher than the Mediterranean. The earliest traces of nearby human habitation date back to the Chalcolithic period (approximately 4500 to 2500 BC). It was mentioned in the Bible and described by many Greek, Roman and Arab writers.

The entire basin is a spectacular landscape characterised by the abundance of a variety of ecosystems, including semitropical marshland, mudflats, wetlands, semi-desert, and arid desert. The diverse ecosystems surrounding the Dead Sea make this area an important site for biodiversity. It is home to some rare and threatened flora and fauna, such as the Lesser Kestrel. The Dead Sea basin is considered one of the main global bird migration routes, as well as an important bird habitat in the Middle East. Along with its ecological importance, the Dead Sea is rich minerals, attracting millions of visitors who wish to take advantage of the therapeutic qualities of its waters.

Jericho Old

Jericho

Located 36 km east of Jerusalem, Jericho is on the road to Amman and at the junction of the highway to the Galilee. In Jericho is Tel As-Sultan, the ancient city of Jericho, which is the lowest (258 m below sea level) and the oldest town on earth, dating back more than 10,000 years. It grew up around a perennial spring, Ain As-Sultan, in an area of fertile alluvial soil which attracted hunter-gatherer groups to settle and start the process of plant and animal domestication. Ain As-Sultan is known as Elisha’s spring, where the prophet Elisha cleansed the water of Jericho.

Jericho’s moderate climate makes it a favourite winter resort, as it is always a number of degrees warmer than other parts of Palestine owing to its low elevation and the height of the surrounding mountains. It is an important agricultural area, producing fresh fruits, and vegetables year round. Jericho dates, bananas and citrus fruits are especially famous.

Tell As-Sultan (ancient Jericho), the Oldest City in the World

The site of Tell As-Sultan is located in the lower plain of the Jordan valley, approximately 10 km north of the Dead Sea. At a depth of 250 m below sea level, and with a history dating back to the Neolithic period, it is the lowest and the oldest town on the earth. The mound where the ruins of the town were found covers an area of about one acre.

The city of ancient Jericho was mentioned in historical sources, a recent find has the name appear on a scarab from the second millennia BC.

Successive excavations at the site uncovered its cultural history stretching 10 thousand years. The earliest remains belong to the Natufian culture (10th-8th millennia BC), and consist of flint tools, which attests to the presence of a hunting Natufian camp near the spring.   The remains of the early Neolithic settlement are represented by a small settlement, with round houses built of mud brick and surrounded by a wall and a round tower, representing the earliest preserved piece of a fortification system.

Jericho played a major role in the early stages of Christianity. In the late Roman and Byzantine periods, the town was reduced to the area of modern Jericho. It was mentioned in several classical sources, including the sixth-century Madaba Mosaic map, where it was marked by the symbol of a church and a palm tree, along with the inscription, “Of St. Elisha.”

Archaeological excavations in the last century have revealed archaeological remains from various sites in the historic core of modern Jericho which shed light on the history of Jericho during the Byzantine period. A considerable number of churches from the Byzantine period have been found in the vicinity of Jericho, including Tell Al-Hassan, the Coptic Church, the Greek Orthodox Church of Abuna Anthimos, and Khirbat En-Nitla. Byzantine remains, including a colourful mosaic floor, were uncovered in 1962. In 2010, during construction work of the Russian museum in Jericho, a salvage excavation was carried out in the area by a Palestinian-Russian expedition, under the direction of Dr. H. Taha and Dr. L.A. Beliaev. The expedition uncovered more architectural remains, including a mosaic floor, which was found during bulldozing work, and a series of buildings dating to early Roman, Byzantine Umayyad, Medieval, and Ottoman periods.

A series of rehabilitation work was carried out in the site by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities during the last decade, within the framework of cooperation with the University of Rome La Sapienza and UNESCO. The site continues to reveal information of some of the earliest civilizations on earth, as well as details about their ways of life and habitation.

Monastery of Temptation (Deir Quruntel)

The summit of the Mount of Temptation rises sharply 350 m above sea level, commanding a magnificent view of the Jordan Valley. The 30 to 40 caves on the eastern slopes of the mountain have been inhabited by monks and hermits since the early days of Christianity. It is the site where Jesus spent forty days and nights fasting and meditating during the temptation of Satan. A monastery was built in the sixth century over the cave where Christ stayed. The path leading to the monastery is very steep and difficult to climb, but is well worth the walk. Alternatively, a cable car scales the heights of the cliff, providing a spectacular view of the surrounding valley.

Hisham’s Palace

Hisham’s Palace is located on the northern bank of Wadi Nueima, 2 km north of Jericho in the Jordan Valley. It was identified as the ruins of Kh. Al-Mafjer. The site was built by Caliph Hisham bin Abed el-Malik who reigned between 724 to 743 AD. The site was used as a winter resort. The spectacular palace was destroyed in a severe earthquake in 749 AD.

The excavation was carried out by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities, between 1935 and 1946 under the direction of D. Baramki and R. Hamilton. The excavation uncovered a significant part of the palace complex. In 2006 excavation was carried out in the bath area, under the direction of H. Taha and between 2010 and 2013 a joint Palestinian-American expedition uncovered the north gate of the palace and remains of the Abbasid occupation in the northern part of the palace

The site is composed of a palace, a thermal bath complex, a mosque, and a monumental fountain within a perimeter wall that was never completed. The three first principal buildings were arranged along the west side of a common forecourt, with a pool covered with a pavilion in its center.

The palace was two stories with towers at the corners. The entrance to the palace was through a vaulted passage, lined with benches on both sides. It was planned around a central courtyard that was enclosed by four arcaded galleries. On the southern side a small mosque was found. In the western gallery of the central courtyard a stairway led to an antechamber paved with mosaics, which lead to an underground vaulted room, or sirdab, with benches and a mosaic floor. The common mosque is attached to the northern wall of the palace.

The large bath is located in the northern part of the palace. It consisted of a domed porch on the east, a great reception hall, a series of small bathing rooms and a latrine. The reception hall was paved with 38 colorful mosaics. In the southern part of the bath, a large swimming pool was found.

At the northwest corner of the reception hall is the diwan, a small guest room, with benches along the walls. The floor of the diwan was paved with fine mosaics, depicting the scene of the tree of life. The palace was supplied with water through an open channel from the Ein Deuk and Ein Nueima springs at the foot of Mount Quruntul.

Following the transfer of authority to the Palestinian side in Jericho, a large restoration and rehabilitation program was carried out by the Palestinian Department of Antiquities at the site,  in cooperation with UNESCO, the Italian Cooperation, ANERA and USAID. The archeological park now includes a modern interpretation centre, a mosaic laboratory, and a site museum, as well as a new bridge and access roads.

The Sycamore Tree and Russian Museum

The sycamore tree that Zacchaeus climbed so as to see Christ on his walk to Jerusalem has been housed since 2010 on the grounds of the Russian museum in Jericho. A salvage excavation was carried out on the lands of the building in June-September 2010 by a Palestinian-Russian expedition, the fruits of which are on display in the museum itself.

Just north of the Russian compound, remains of a mosaic floor appeared during bulldozing work. Excavation teams revealed a series of buildings, and mosaic pavements dating to the early Roman, Byzantine Umayyad, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

These, and ruins of Byzantine churches in the area are a testament to the major role Jericho played in the early stages of Christianity.

Ain Ad-Deuk Synagogue

The site of the Ain Ad-Deuk synagogue is located on the northern Bank of Wadi Nueima, northwest of Jericho. The site was exposed in 1918 by a shell fired by the Turks at the British in the area. Excavations in 1919 revealed a mosaic floor decorated with menorahs and Aramaic inscription.

The synagogue consists of a main hall, a narthex, and an adjoining courtyard surrounded by a wall. The entrance of the courtyard was to the north. The hall had a basilical plan and was divided by two rows of six columns into a nave and two aisles. The entire hall was paved with mosaics, while the narthex was paved with a white mosaic laid in black frame.

A series of conservation activities were carried out at the Synagogue by the Palestinian Authority Department of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage in 2002 and 2004 aiming to maintain the mosaic pavements.

 

Shahwan House Mosaic

In 1936 a synagogue was discovered north of Tell As-Sultan in what is today the house basement of the Shahwan family. The remains revealed a building with a rectangular plan, divided into a nave and two aisles by two rows of square pillars. The pavement of the building is of mosaic with stylized geometric and floral design. In 2008 a series of restorations were carried out, including the restoration of the mosaic pavement.

Tawaheen As-Sukkar (The Sugar Mills)

Located in the lower foothills of the Jordan Valley, the original function of the once industrial zone is preserved in the name of the site, ‘the sugar mills.’ The mills give visitors an opportunity to take a look at an industrial installation for manufacturing sugar that was part of the economic activity in the Jordan Valley during the medieval period.

The Jordan Valley’s sugar cane cultivation and mills were mentioned in several early medieval sources, which described Jericho in 1225 AD as a city famous for sugar cane and dates. Three different components of the manufacturing process can be seen in the ruins of a water aqueduct, a courtyard, press, mill house, refinery, furnace, kitchen and a storage house.  These represent three parts of the process: a water system, refinery, and the agricultural land.

Sugar cane was planted and harvested on the land, then shredded, crushed, and pressed. It was later boiled, and the resulting crystallized sugar was removed from the containers. The mill was powered by water brought by aqueducts from the springs of Ain Nueima and Ain Deyuk at the north-eastern foot of Mount of Temptation.

Qumran

Located 15km south of Jericho on the western shore of the Dead Sea, this is the site where the famous Dead Sea Scrolls were found. A Palestinian shepherd looking for a stray goat made the discovery of the scrolls in 1947.

The scrolls consist of copies of biblical and apocryphal literature, the writings of the sect, including the Commentaries, the Rule of the Community, the Scroll of the War of the Sons of Light against the Sons of Darkness, and the Damascus Document. The dates of these scrolls range from the second century BC to 68 AD, but mostly dated from the first century BC. The study of the scrolls developed into an academic discipline known as Qumranic studies. It provides us with valuable information about the history of Judaism and the early phase of Christianity.

Following the find, several excavations were carried out in the site and the surrounding caves. The excavated site revealed a large complex of buildings, including communal facilities, a sophisticated water system, a library, and a large cemetery.

 

 

Wadi Qelt and the Monastery of Saint George

Wadi Qelt is a natural rift with high, sheer rock walls extending 45 km through the hills between Jerusalem and Jericho. Hermits have inhabited the wadi since the third century. Today, it is a wonderful place for hiking, especially in the winter. The Monastery of Saint George, Deir Al-Qelt, is an impressive structure carved out of the rock of the cliff walls. Built in the fifth or sixth century, the monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion of Palestine. Most of the present monastery dates back to a 1901 restoration done by the Greek Orthodox Church.

The Good Samaritan Inn

Located 10 km east of Jerusalem on the main road to Jericho, the Good Samaritan Inn (Al-Khan Al-Ahmar, literally ‘The Red Inn’) is a sixteenth-century structure that once served as a rest stop for travellers. Today, the inn is occupied by a souvenir shop and a Bedouin tent serving refreshments to tourists. On the other side of the road are the remains of Saint Euthymius Church, which was built in the fifth century to commemorate the biblical story of the Good Samaritan.

 

Maqam An-Nabi Musa

Nabi Musa is the Arabic name for the Prophet Moses, who is recognised as one of the most important prophets in Islam, as well as Christianity and Judaism. Maqam An-Nabi Musa has been the site of an annual pilgrimage since the time of Salah Ad-Din. Set in an awe-inspiring landscape 20 km east of Jerusalem, the shrine is a splendid example of medieval Islamic architecture. The shrine, mosque, minaret, and some of the rooms at the site were built in 1269, and successive additions were added in 1475.

The Jordan River

The Jordan River flows from Mount Hermon in Syria, about 3,000 feet above sea level, to the Dead Sea, which is 1,300 feet below sea level. The winding Jordan River, with an average width of 100 feet, covers a distance of only 65 miles as the crow flies. However, if it were stretched out, the riverbed would cover 160 miles end-to-end. Jesus was baptised by John in the Jordan River, and ever since, the river has been a holy site for Christians, with many pilgrims visiting the river every year to be baptised.

The Dead Sea

The Dead Sea, also known as the Salt Sea and the Sea of Lot, is a unique body of water in the Jordan Rift Valley. The Dead Sea is 85 km long and 17 km wide and covers an area of about 677 square km. It lies about 417 m below sea level, making the Dead Sea the lowest point on Earth. In addition, the Dead Sea is the world’s saltiest large water body, with a salt concentration ten times higher than the Mediterranean. The earliest traces of nearby human habitation date back to the Chalcolithic period (approximately 4500 to 2500 BC). It was mentioned in the Bible and described by many Greek, Roman and Arab writers.

The entire basin is a spectacular landscape characterised by the abundance of a variety of ecosystems, including semitropical marshland, mudflats, wetlands, semi-desert, and arid desert. The diverse ecosystems surrounding the Dead Sea make this area an important site for biodiversity. It is home to some rare and threatened flora and fauna, such as the Lesser Kestrel. The Dead Sea basin is considered one of the main global bird migration routes, as well as an important bird habitat in the Middle East. Along with its ecological importance, the Dead Sea is rich minerals, attracting millions of visitors who wish to take advantage of the therapeutic qualities of its waters.

Jericho: Palestine’s Winter Escape

Jericho Attractions

Ancient Jericho Tell al-Sultan

The ancient city ofJerichois located 2 km from the northwestern outskirts ofJericho. Situated on a mound overlooking theJerichooasis, excavations at Tell al-Sultan uncovered 23 layers of ancient civilizations, dating back to 9000 BC. Many structures are visible, including the oldest known stairs in the world, the oldest wall, and the massive defense tower, dating back to 7000 BC.

Hisham’s Palace

Representing a sample of early Islamic architecture, the ruins of this impressive desert palace lie 3 km from the northern outskirts ofJericho. This country residence of the Umayyad Caliph Hisham (724-743 AD) is a complex of royal buildings, mosques, baths, and colonnaded courts. There are also spectacular mosaic floors can be seen including the “Tree of Life” mosaic, one of the most beautiful in the world. Another famous feature is a courtyard framework featuring the shape of hexagonal Umayyad star.

Quarantine – Monastery of Temptation

The summit of Mt.Temptation, rising to a height of 350 meters above sea level and commanding a magnificent view of theJordanValley, is the site where Jesus spent forty days and nights fasting and meditating during the temptation of Satan. A monastery was built in the sixth century over the cave where Christ stayed. The path leading to Deir Quruntel is very steep and difficult to climb, but is well worth the walk. The nearly 30-40 caves on the eastern slopes of the mountain have been inhabited by monks and hermits since the early days of Christianity.

Fountains of Jericho

Fountain of Eliseus Ain Es-Sultan

To the east of Tell es Sultan is Ain es Sultan, called by the Christians the Fountain of Eliseus, because the prophet, touched by the prayers of the inhabitants of Jericho, corrected the bitterness of the water and made it palatable by casting into it a handful of salt (2 Kings 2,19). The Byzantines built here a church in honour of St. Eliseus. It was the water of the spring which led to the early occupation of the nearby site, and today its water, regulated by law, accounts for the beautiful gardens of bananas, oranges, dates etc, in this most delightful of oases.

Ain Duq

At the foot of themountainofQuarantinethere is a track that leads you to Ain Duq, which, however is more easily reached from the main road leading north from Tell es Sultan.

Ain Nu’eima

A short distance to the north ofJerichois Ain Nu’eima. Remains of the ancient aqueducts are to be seen on all sides.

Ain El Qilt

Ain el Qilt is located in the gorge of Wadi el Qilt south west ofJericho. The whole gorge is very picturesque, its precipitous sides rising to several hundred meters. It makes a pleasant and not over-strenuous walk.

Ain Hajla

Leaving the Castle of Hajla at the banks of the Jordan river, you meet with a pleasant garden due to the presence of the spring Ain Hajla which preserves the name of Beth Hoglah of the Bible (Jos.15,6; 18,19.21). The plantations belong to the Greek Orthodox. A track runs from Ain Hajla to meet the road fromJerichoto theJordan.

Sugar Mills Tawahin es-Sukkar

Production of sugar here dates to the Omayyad period (seventh-eighth centuries) but was at its height during Crusader days. There is a mediaeval mill east of the Mount of Temptation near Tell es-Sultan where remains of the hydraulic system, a forced conduit, or flying aqueduct, are partly preserved. Calcite deposits on the inside walls reveal the force of water from the Ein Duq springs. The pottery workshop here specialized in ceramic vessels for use in sugar production.

Shahwan’s Synagogue

Heading just north of Ain es Sultan on the main road, you will find to the right a track leads into a clump of trees, and within the property of the Shahwan family can be seen the foundations and mosaic floor of a synagogue discovered in 1936. The date of the construction is believed to be the 8th cent and it is an interesting item for the history of the Jews at that time.

Herodium Jericho Tulul Abul-Alayeq

The site is made up of several low hills on both sides of wadi Qelt. It is located right at the southern entrance ofJericho, at the point where wadi Qelt meets the plateau of Jericho. The site can be reached either from the main Jerusalem-Jericho road, or better via the old road toJerichowhich lines the wadi. The oldest discoveries at Tulul Abu Al Alaieq date back to the Chalcolithic period 4500-3100BC, but the most impressive remains are either from the Hellenistic or the Roman periods in date. In Roman times,Jerichowas a garden of fruit and palm trees, it was given as a gift to Cleopatra by Mark Antony.

The city reached its peak under Herod the Great who built his winter palace at the site of Tulul Abu Al Alaieq. This palace is the best preserved and the most impressive structure at the site which seems to have served as the administrative center of the town ofJerichoat that time. It was built on both sides of the wadi to allow the inhabitants to enjoy the scene of the waters of the wadi in winter. A huge garden of palm trees and Balsam measuring 11000m2 was found during excavation works on the site to the north of the palace. It was called theRoyalGarden. The foundations of a wall surrounding the complex, several workshops, pools, ovens, a large wine press, sewage systems and liquid storage buildings, were also found in what is believed to be the industrial area of the city.

It is not clear when the site was abandoned, this might have happened after the earthquake which shook the area around the middle of the AD 1st century. Some remains at Tulul Abu Al Alaieq from the Byzantine and Islamic periods indicate that the site was never completely abandoned but rather shrunk in size. There are no entrance fees at the site and visiting is possible all day long

Nabi Mousa

The maqam of Nabi Mousa is considered a holy place because it houses the grave of prophet Moses according to local tradition. Moses is recognized by Moslems as one of the great prophets of Islam. The bituminous rocks around the shrine add to its mystique and sanctity since they are flammable. This remarkable property is due to their mineral content of qatraan or tar, with its distinctive smell. Pilgrims used the stones as fuel for warmth and cooking.

The tomb has been the site of annual pilgrimage festival or mawsim at least since the time of the great Muslim leader Salah Al Din ( Saladin ) who liberatedJerusalemfrom the Crusaders in the twelfth century AD. Muslims believe that Moses is buried here, although, according to the Old Testament (Deuteronomy 34), Moses never enteredPalestine, the ”Promised Land”, but rather died atMountNeboin modern-dayJordan.

The main body of the present shrine-the mosque, minaret, and some of the rooms – was completed in AD 1269 during the reign of the Mamluk Sultan, Al Thaher Baybars who reigned from AD 1260 to 1277.

The mawsim of Nabi Mousa

The development of the annual pilgrimage and festival of Nabi’ Musa (15-30 April) goes back to the time of the liberation ofJerusalemby Saladin from the crusaders. As a show of Muslim strength and good will to the Christians, Saladin allowed, under the terms of the agreement, the Crusades and another Western pilgrims to visit the Christian holy places at Easter time. That is the reason why the pilgrims and festival of Nabi Musa falls always on the week proceeding Easter.

Good Samaritan Inn – Al-Khan al-Ahmar

Located 10km east ofJerusalem, on the main road toJericho, al-Khan al-Ahmar is a 16th century structure where travelers on this ancient trade route stopped to rest. On the other side of the road are the remains of St. Euthymius Church, built in the fifth century to commemorate Jesus’ famous proverb of the Good Samaritan.

St. George’s Monastery & Wadi Qelt

Wadi Qelt is a natural rift in the hills with high, sheer rock walls, extending 45km betweenJerusalemandJericho. Hermits have inhabited the Wadi since the third century. Today, it is a wonderful place for hiking tours, especially in winter. The Monastery of St. George, Deir al-Qelt, is carved out of the rock and clings to the canyon walls impressively. Built in the fifth century, the monastery was destroyed during the Persian invasion ofPalestine. Most of the present monastery dates back to the 1901 restoration by the Greek Orthodox Church.

JerichoTéléphérique

The Téléphérique cable cars offer visitors a short but scenic ride up the Mount of Temptation. The cars, which drop off passengers just a few hundred feet from the Greek Orthodox Monastery of Temptation, save tourists from the traditionally long –and tiring- walk or donkey ride up the mount.

The Spanish Park

The Municipality of Jericho has accomplished a very important project which is a public park called theSpanishPark. This is a nice place for the people ofJerichoas well as for the tourists to spend their time.

AroundJericho

Jordan River – Baptism Site

Jordan River, the great holy river of Palestine, the Jordan, rises in several headstreams near Mount Hermon in the mountains of Syria and Lebanon and flows more than 322 kilometers south through the Great Rift Valley to the Dead Sea. It is one of the world’s most remarkable rivers because of its association with Hebrew and Christian history and the unique descent in its course from 79 meters above sea level to 391 meters below sea level. From ancient times the river has marked a dividing line between settled and nomad peoples.

Dead Sea

Dead Sea, located in the south of theJordanValley, the salty closed sea 400 meters below sea level is the lowest spot on Earth. The scenery on the shores of the sea in enchanting.

The Dead Sea is famous for its extraordinary salt and mineral content, which many people say makes it a natural healing agent for skin problems. People from around the world have been visiting theDead Seafor many years for curative treatments and to enjoy its relaxing waters.

Qumran: Caves and Monastery of theDead SeaScrolls

Qumran is located on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea where theDead Seascrolls were uncovered in the 1940s.

The Dead Sea Scrolls constitute one of the major archeological discoveries of the 20th century. They incorporate the earliest known manuscripts of the Bible as well as other important historical documents describing the life of the Essene community. At the same time, they are a main source for the study of the history ofPalestine: the Dead Sea Scrolls have shed light on Judaism and the roots of Christianity on the shore of theDead Sea.

Jericho Accommodation

Hotels

Intercontinental Jericho
Category: 5stars
(181 rooms; su; bf; cf; mr; res; ter; tb)
Tel: 02-2311200
Fax: 02-2311222
jrcha.reservation@ichotelgroups.com

Jericho Hotel &Resort Village
Category: 4stars
(60 rooms; 46 studios; bf; cf; mr; res)
Tel: 02-2321255
Fax: 02-2322189
jerichresorts@hotmail.com
reservation@jerichoresoresort.com

Jericho Moon City Hotel
Category: 1 Star
Tel: 02-2327292
Fax: 02-2326844
yusraswaity@yahoo.com

Jerusalem Resort Hotel
Category: unclassified
(22 rooms)
Tel: 02-2322444
Fax: 02-2323109

Guest Houses

Roman Pilgrims Hostel
Tel: +970-2-2320903

WEDO GuestHouse
Tel: 02-2310424
Fax: 02-2310424

Where To Stay

Bethlehem

Gaza

Hebron

JENIN

JERICHO

JERUSALEM

NABLUS

 

Ramallah

The Bride of Palestine

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Located 16 km north of Jerusalem, at an elevation of 900 m above sea level at the crest of the Hills. It is known as the “Bride of Palestine” for its general geographical beauty. Ramallah has a pleasant, cool climate and has long been a popular Summer resort. . During the twelfth century, French Crusaders built a stronghold in Ramallah, and the remains of a Crusader tower, known as At-Tira, can still be seen in the old part of town.

Modern Ramallah has a lively town centre, museums, art galleries, theatres, parks, booming restaurant scene, and bustling nightlife, Ramallah is a fast-growing cosmopolitan town. It is also much serviced for visitor, with comfortable places to stay, some Palestine’s best restaurants, good transport and other tourism –related services, and hospitable, friendly people

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Al-Bireh

Ramallah’s twin city, Al-Bireh, is located on the central ridge running through the mountain of central Palestine, and is 900m above sea level, its location served as a  crossborder trade.

between the north and south, along the caravan route between Jerusalem and Nablus. The name of Al -Bireh is derived from the Canaanite name Beeroth means “Water Well”. In Roman period named Berta means castle, during Crusader period a settlement was established on al Bireh, and was first known as  Mahumeria then its name was changed to Magna Mahumeria means the worshiping. The Crusaders built a tower, administrative building (Curia) which was used as a Crusader headquarter, in addition to a church which was located at the center of the city.

According to Christian tradition, Joseph and Mary rested in Al-Bireh on their way from Jerusalem to Nazareth when they discovered that Jesus was missing. A Crusader church, known as the Church of the Holy Family, marks the spot where they stopped. The church of al-Bira is recorded in September 1128, when it and the other villages appurtenances were confirmed to Holy Sepulcher by Pope Honorius II.  Around 1172 the Pilgrim Theodric recorded that the Church dedicated to St. Mary which belonged to the Templars, might have been converted in to a mosque in the Ayyubid period .By 1514 the vaulting had collapsed ,most walls were still recognized until the First World War. The church plan is a three –aisled basilica of four bays, measuring overall about 22 by 34/37 m .Its east end terminated in to three semi –circular apses, the central one being preceded by a barrel-vault .2.10m deep. The walls were about 2.70m thick, on the inside they were faced throughout with smoothly dressed ashlars, and on the outside with rougher blocks. The main door was probably in the center of the west.

 

Beitin

Beitin is located approximately 14 km north of Jerusalem and 5 kilometres east of Ramallah. It is identified as ancient Beth El (House of God). The town of Beitin was mentioned in the classical sources as a city fortified by Bacchides, military commander of Ptolemy Soter of Egypt, and destroyed by Vespasian during the uprising against the Romans.

The site of Tell Beitin was excavated between 1934 and 1960 by W. F. Albright and J. L. Kelso on behalf of the American School of Oriental Research. The earliest remains date to the Bronze Age, around 2100 BC. The town was settled throughout the Iron Age and the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Arab, Mamluke, and late-Ottoman periods.

New archaeological surveys and excavations were carried out at Beitin by a joint Palestinian-Japanese expedition between 2011 and 2013, from the Palestinian Department of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage of the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, and Keio University, Japan, in cooperation with the local community of Beitin, under the direction of H. Taha and D. Sugimoto.

The expedition team conducted a general survey of the Beitin area, mapping out the main archaeological features, including the tell, the burj, the water system, and the cultural landscape. Burj Beitin is believed to be the site of a Byzantine monastery built of ashlar stones, and which is composed of an impressive triple gate, rooms paved with beautiful coloured mosaics, a two-story tower with a door, a central courtyard, and a cistern within a perimeter wall. The preserved parts of the mosaic floors are decorated with geometric and floral patterns, including bunches of grapes. The excavation in the western area next to the tower uncovered the western door of the tower and courtyards paved with flagstones from the first phase of its construction. The construction techniques and the materials showed that the tower was constructed during the Byzantine period (fourth century AD), and was renovated several times before the beginning of the Mamluk Period. The other important result of this excavation was the identification of the Mamluk town of Beitin. The village of Beitin is a living museum, with its rich archaeological and cultural resources. It has great potential for being developed as an important tourist attraction in Palestine.

 

 

Taybeh

St george church Taybeh

 

The picturesque town of Taybeh is located 12km northeast of Ramallah, from its elevated spot it overlooks the desert wilderness, the Jordan Valley, Jericho, and the Dead Sea. Taybeh is also rich in history and culture. Ruins of a Byzantine church known as ”Al Khader” (Saint George) are situated east of town. Still standing are two chapels, an entrance portico and stairway, parts of a mosaic floor, and its well-preserved baptistery.  The church was rebuilt by the Crusaders during the 12th century. In 2010 the Department of Antiquities discovered a tomb dating back to Byzantine to early Islamic period .Restoration work was carried out in downtown of Taybeh, an annual October fest is held in the town

 

Abud

The village of Abud is located 30km northwest of Jerusalem, lying on the principal Roman road via Gophna (Jifna) to Antipatris (Ras el-‘Ain).Archaeological surveys have revealed a long history of occupation, stretching from the Roman period to the present. Evidence of Roman, Byzantine, Crusader, Ayyubid, Mamluk and Ottoman occupation was attested in several sites of the village, such as the coloured rock-cut tombs in el- Maqati‘, 2 km west. The site was identified with Casale Santa Maria of the Crusader period.  Abud was mentioned in the Frankish sources (12th century) as the village of St. Mary sold by Baldwin of Mirabel to the Hospital in 1167. From 1176 the income from the village was devoted to the provisions of white bread for the sick in the Hospital in Jerusalem In this period three Syriac monks from Abud are mentioned in the colophons of liturgical  manuscripts. The first is  Elias, who constructed the monastery of Deir el-Kaukab, between Abud and Deir Abu Mashal (Belfort), sometime after 1030; In the Late Medieval (14 century) Yaqut Al-Hamawi  described Abud as a small village near Jerusalem  The village of Abud was mentioned in the Ottoman dafters in the late 16th century as part of the Ramla Nahiya Later Abud was part of the Banei Zeid region.

A number of ruined churches dating to the Byzantine and early Medieval period were identified in and around the village of Abud, including Mar Abadiya church, St. Anastasia’s Church, St. Barbara’s church, St. Theodore’s church and St. Mary church.

 

The church of St. Mary al-‘Abudiyah

Located in the centre of the old village of  Abud. The church was dedicated to St. Mary, presumably during the Crusader period, when the village was renamed as Casale Santa Maria. An Aramaic inscription found on the vault of the south aisle indicates that it had been rebuilt during the Fatimid period, in “the 450th year of the Bedouins”, which would bring us to the year 1058. The inscription mentions also the founder of the church. According to the popular religious tradition, Jesus Christ passed through this road to Nazareth avoiding the road via Samaria, because of the eminent hostility between Jews and Samaritans. The church is known for its miracles, and therefore occupies a distinguished position among the churches of Abud. It is visited by Christians of Palestine and Jordan, especially on the annual feast of the Virgin Mary, on August 28, for the blessings and making vows.

 

Nabi Samwil (Prophet Samuel)

Is situated on top of a mountain, 890m above sea level and 4 km north of Jerusalem. The village is traditionally held to contain the tomb of the prophet Samwil from which the village receives its name.  It was built around a mosque with a minaret that offers an extensive view of the hills of Jerusalem.  Its mosque acts as a prominent landmark. The site consists of a large turreted mosque and a cellar, which holds the cloth-covered tomb of Samuel. In Byzantine period a monastery was built at Nabi Samwil, serving as a hostel for Christian pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem. It was restored and enlarged during the reign of Justinian I in the mid-6th-century AD.

 

Al-Jib (Gibeon)                                                                                                            

Is located at an altitude of 739m above sea level , a few kilometres north of Nabi Samwil, the picturesque village of Al-Jib is the site of the ancient Canaanite  city of “Gibeon”, meaning a hilltop, and it was mentioned by the Romans and Franks as Gabaon.Archaeological excavations confirmed this identification with the discovery of 56 jar handles inscribed with the Semitic triliteral gb’n. In the seventh century, Gibeon was a prosperous wine-producing city. Excavations in the area have uncovered sixty-three wine cellars, each capable of storing forty-two large barrels of wine. Other interesting finds include a well-preserved ancient water system.The ancient tell is a rocky hill situated in the midst of a beautiful, intensely cultivated plain, the site included an impressive ancient water system (twelfth- to eleventh-century BC) water pool and a cistern which have a spiral staircase of 79 steps cut in solid rock, giving access to a spring outside the walls. This system denied water to attackers while making it available to inhabitants under siege.

 

Tell Al-Nasbah                                                                                                             

Located at the southern entrance of Al-Bireh, 14 kilometers northwest of Jerusalem, the site lies adjacent to ancient road way connecting Jerusalem to Nablus. Tell en-Nasbah was occupied in the Late Chalcolitic and Early Bronze I periods, when it was a relatively small village. After this time the site was virtually abandoned until the beginning of the Iron Age. During  9-8th centuries the site was reused as a walled settlement with massive gate .Archaeological excavations uncovered pottery, coins and other small finds which  indicate that some settlement at the site into the Hellenistic Roman period was probably an agricultural estate, occupied by a watch tower, kilns, a few buildings and fields. The tell does not seem to have been occupied in later times, though Byzantine tombs were found in the extra-mural cemeteries and the floor of a Byzantine church near the west cemetery was uncovered

 

Birzeit

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The town of Birzeit is located in the hills around 10 km north of Ramallah. It is identified as ancient Berzetho from the Greek-Roman period. It was first occupied in the Bronze Age as attested by the site Tell Ar-Ras, which is north of the town. It was continuously inhabited during the Iron Age and the Greek-Roman period, as indicated by archaeological evidence at a site known as Khirbet Birzeit. The buildings in the center of town were built during the Mamluk and Ottoman periods. Today, Birzeit is home to Birzeit University, the oldest university in Palestine, which was founded in 1924.

 

Jifna

Located near Birzeit, Jifna is a small, scenic village that was once an important Roman-Byzantine city. Previously known as Gophna of Josephus, Jifna was the regional capital during the first century AD. Today, Jifna is a popular summer resort, offering a variety of outdoor restaurants, bars, and coffee shops.

 

Ein Kenya Nature Reserve

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A beautiful nature reserve 7 km northwest of Ramallah, Ein Kenya is named after its natural springs. A variety of wild plants, birds, and animals make Ein Kenya a great place for picnics and hiking.

Where To Go

Visitors to Palestine seeking a unique and unforgettable journey can dive into the history of the earliest human settlement in Jericho and Wadi Khareitoun. They can trace the advent of urban society, the footsteps of prophets, or the path of Jesus Christ from birth to resurrection. Simply travelling from one city to the next offers an eclectic mix of heritage. In Bethlehem, travellers can visit the Grotto of Nativity where Jesus Christ was born, then travel southeast to the village of Beit Sahour where they can see the Shepherd’s fields. Then, on southward along Hebron Road travellers will find the remains of an ancient water system; Solomon’s pools and their extensive water canals. Further down the road is Hebron city, a vibrant economic centre, it is also home to the burial place of six of monotheism’s patriarchs, and the fourth sacred city of Islam.

East is the Jordan River, where John baptized Jesus Christ. The sycamore tree that Zacchaeus climbed so he could see Christ on his walk to Jerusalem sits just in the new city of Jericho, and west of the city are the high cliffs known as the Mount of Temptation, home for centuries to a Greek Orthodox monastery. Beyond the biblical, the Jordan Valley plays host to several important and attractive sites including the Dead Sea, where the Dead Sea scrolls were found at Qumran, the oldest city on earth Tell al-Sultan, the sugar mills, and the nearby Hisham’s Palace; sites dating from the Prehistoric Periods through to the Bronze, and Iron Ages, up to the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, Crusader, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid Ayyubid, Mamluk, and Ottoman times.  With bicycle rentals in the town center and a cable car to the mount, hundreds of thousands of years of human history can be taken in during an afternoon.

Then turning north, is the city of Jenin; one of the oldest places of habitation on the ancient plain of Marj Ibn Amer. At the south-eastern edge of the plain, a few kilometres west of the city stands the fourth century Church of Burqin, erected to mark the spot where Jesus healed the lepers. The city would have been one of those in the path of Mary and Joseph as they travelled on their way to Bethlehem from Nazareth. Along this path, olive trees –more common in the central and northern districts—gradually give way to vineyards, which are dominant in the south, especially on the Hebron and Bethlehem hills. Stone terraces enclose the trees and vines, and watchtowers are distinctive features of the rolling hills. Fieldstones used to terrace the hills make use of the mountain terrain, and additionally retain moisture and prevent soil from eroding.  Watchtowers were themselves important for seasonal agricultural, used to guard the fields and crops, and are living testimonies of the relationship between the Palestinian farmer and his land.

South of Jenin is Nablus, nestled between two round mountains along the floor of the valley between, homes over the years have crept up the hills offering spectacular views of the city core. In its center, visitors can walk through the historic market and dense old city, with its fabric shops, mosques, and churches. With a working olive oil soap factory, and home of Palestine’s favourite desert, Nablus is the capital of the north. Nearby are sister cities Tulkarem and Qalqilia, found on the fringe of Palestine’s central mountainous ridge south of Marj Ibn Amer, and represent the central zone of Palestine. The area played an important role in the past as a crossroad between the sea and the northern region, and today is the site of hundreds of archaeological features (Tell Taannek, Tell Jenin, Khirbit Bal’ama, Tell Dothan, Khirbet As-Samra, and Wadi Qana), which provide information about the region’s cultural history. This area is known as the breadbasket of the area, with farmers growing wheat, olives, almonds, figs, and citrus.

Traveling southwest towards Palestine’s coast is Gaza. Its old city market is a top attraction, as are  archaeological sites like Tell Al-Ajjul, Tell As-Sakan, Tell Al-Blakhyia, and Umm Amer, as well as the newly excavated Byzantine churches dating back to the fourth and fifth centuries AD, only recently unearthed and renovated.

The heart of Palestinian culture is, of course, Jerusalem. The city where Jesus Christ walked and spread his message of peace and love, where he spent his last days with loyal disciples, and where he was crucified, buried, and resurrected. It is also in Jerusalem where visitors can visit the magnificent Dome of the Rock and the Al-Aqsa Mosque, two of Islam’s holiest and the most beautiful shrines that make the skyline of Jerusalem so unique and iconic.

Jerusalem

Bethlehem

Hebron

Jericho

Ramallah

Nablus

Jenin

Tulkarem

Gaza